Why I shoot film

 

Shooting film Leica camera
My Small Walking Camera

I shoot film for all my principal photography. It is a personal choice.

My reasons for choosing film rather than digital are part technical, part aesthetic and part emotional. Ultimately, film makes me a better photographer, I enjoy the process more and I like the way the pictures look.

Film looks filmy and it’s fun to use. But I don’t want to make lite of film, film offers some serious benefits for the serious photographic artist.

There is no doubt that digital is the best option for most kinds of photography.  So this is not a film versus digital debate. It is personal.

Firstly, film is an incredible teacher. My film cameras are really just dumb boxes, and film is very unforgiving when exposed to light. So when I shoot film, especially with a dumb camera, I have no choice but to learn to be a good technical photographer.  If I don’t, anything creative I might try to do, probably won’t look very good.  It is my keenness to learn photography which drives me towards film.

Using film puts in a particular environment which has a huge influence on how I make pictures.

Let me explain. Continue reading “Why I shoot film”

Two photographs from Two very different cameras…

Two photographs made with two very different, but unique, cameras.

Can you spot the difference? And, should the camera make any difference to how we judge these photographs?

I think sometimes we feel we need a special camera to make a great photograph. And while I do understand that at times we need specialised equipment for particular results, in most cases the camera should not matter. But is that true with these two pictures?

I worry that our fixation on equipment comes at the expense of us developing our vision and creative skills which I think are far more decisive to the outcome than any camera we might choose to use.

Here are two photographs below, both of which I love.  They are artful expressions of my love of the outdoors. Both would sit well in a body of work and both will look beautiful mounted and framed.

For this outcome the camera should not matter… or should it?
Continue reading “Two photographs from Two very different cameras…”

Mamiya 7II medium format rangefinder camera system.

The Mamiya 7II film camera

Mamiya web site  Photography examples  Other Mamiya 7II reviews – Ken Rockwell  Other Mamiya 7II reviews – Tom Westbrook

The Mamiya 7II is a special camera. It shoots film and uses some of the most outstanding lenses ever made… and that’s about all there is to it.

Most camera reviews try and tell (and sell) you all the great features which a camera has. Well this film camera has very few features and yet the Mamiya 7II is one of the best cameras ever made.

In fact for many specific applications, the Mamiya 7II is most likely the best camera in the world. Its exceptional optics and  simplicity of use makes it a near perfect camera for ‘walk-about’ landscape and fine art photography.

The Mamiya 7II is a medium format rangefinder film camera. It makes a 6 x 7cm image on 120 or 220 rolls film.

Mamiya 7II film camera

 

What is a rangefinder camera?

The key characteristic of a rangefinder camera is that you don’t look through the lens, but through a separate window which has a range finding focusing mechanism built-in. This is coupled to the focusing movement on the lens itself. The benefit of this approach is that it allows for a more perfect optical design of the actual lens than has been possible in a ‘through-the-lens’ camera system. The result is the potential for a more technically brilliant lens, a very quiet shutter and a more compact overall camera system. The Mamiya 7II meets these objectives.

What is the benefit of a photographic film camera?

Film photography has some significant benefits. While there is absolutely nothing wrong with digital, film offers some unique advantages. I have written separately here as to Why I shoot film.

Mamiya 43mm f/4.5 lens

Continue reading “Mamiya 7II medium format rangefinder camera system.”

Kurt Mottweiler’s ~ hand built, wood and brass pinhole camera.

It started as a modest drawing in Kurt Mottweiler’s sketchbook. It became a beautiful bespoke instrument;  The P.90, a hand crafted lensless, medium format camera made from a blend of cherrywood, custom made brass and other carefully chosen materials.

The P.90 is a very limited edition camera designed by an artist, for artists. A work of art with which to make art. However, it is also a camera designed to be used, where function meets a beautiful aesthetic for a memorable picture making experience.

The craftsman is Kurt Mottweiler.

From his Oregon studio workshop Kurt makes his hand built cameras with love and passion. They will no doubt become valuable collector items over time; much like an early Leica. Perhaps they will become the ‘Stradivarius’ of pin hole cameras?

Continue reading “Kurt Mottweiler’s ~ hand built, wood and brass pinhole camera.”